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Affidavit - $50.00


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What is an Affidavit?

An Affidavit is a document created by a person (the “Affiant”), containing voluntary statements (“Affirmations”) based on personal knowledge. Statements based on personal knowledge would be any facts that the Affiant directly observed or experienced. By signing the Affidavit, the Affiant is swearing under oath that the statements in the document are true to the best of the Affiant’s knowledge. Depending on how the Affidavit is used, the Affiant could be liable for perjury for knowingly making false Affirmations.

What are commons applications for the Affidavit?

Affidavits are very common in probate proceedings and transfers of property. For example, an Affidavit may be required to inform a probate court of family relations, witnesses to a Last Will and Testament, or efforts to locate original Will. Affidavits are also very common in real estate transfers to explain title changes (e.g. death of co-owner).


Bill of Sale - $45.00


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What is a Bill of Sale?

A Bill of Sale is a written statement describing the details of a sale or transfer of goods, possessions, or business interest from a Seller to a Buyer. The details will include a description of the item(s) sold or transferred and the money or other item(s) transferred in exchange.

What are commons applications for the Bill of Sale?

The Bill of Sale serves as proof that the Buyer now has ownership of the described item. In simpler terms, a Bill of Sale is a legally valid receipt (treated as a contract) for a private transaction. To validate this transaction, a witness and notary public is advised for subsequent titling and proof of ownership. The resulting document serves as proof that the Buyer now has ownership of the described item.

A witness and notary are typically required by state and local governments to transfer title for certain types of assets; these laws vary from state to state. If you are planning to execute a Bill of Sale without a witness and notary, check your state and local laws to be sure of the formality requirements.


Burial Trust - $350.00


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What is a Burial Trust?

A Burial Trust is a written document you create during your lifetime to hold funds designated to pay for your funeral, memorial, burial, cremation, and other related expenses. The terms of the Burial Trust are managed by a Trustee as specified by you. Upon your passing, the Trustee will use the Trust assets (e.g. a bank certificate of deposit) to pay for expenses associated with the disposition of your body.

What are commons applications for the Burial Trust?

Funds placed into the Burial Trust are kept separate from your personal assets and provide asset protection benefits. In many cases, the Burial Trust will be considered an exempt asset for purposes of Nursing Home Medicaid and Veterans Affairs (VA) benefits. You may also choose to own a life insurance policy that pays directly to the Trust upon your passing, which offers benefits such as tax-free payments, protection from inflation, and avoidance from confiscation by Medicaid or nursing homes.

The Burial Trust does not specify the type of disposition desired. You will separately express whether you want cremation or burial. This expression can be done in a written statement or incorporated into an Advance Directive for Health Care.


Disclaimer - $65.00


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What is a Disclaimer?

A Disclaimer is a written document that allows a person to give up or renounce assets that he/she has a legal right to receive.

What are commons applications for the Disclaimer?

The elawconnection.com Disclaimer document is intended for a person to give up assets that he/she is entitled to inherit. Many times the Disclaimer is used to redirect an inheritance to another person for tax or asset protection reasons.


Family Contribution Agreement - $50.00


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What is a Family Contribution Agreement?

A Family Contribution Agreement is a legal instrument that provides the details of an agreement between a parent (or his/her representative) who is in need of financial support and the adult child or children of that parent who are agreeing to share the cost of the parent’s essential needs. The Agreement details the financial support and reimbursement for any assets of parent following death.

What are commons applications for the Family Contribution Agreement?

Children that assist parents with financial support will use the Agreement to (i) ensure that assets of the parent are first used to reimburse him/her for out of pocket expenses, and (ii) receive the income tax benefits associated with the support payments.


Family Purchase and Sale Agreement - $70.00


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What is a Family Purchase and Sale Agreement?

A Family Purchase and Sale Agreement is a document that specifies in writing the proposed purchase and sale of real property. The Purchase and Sale Agreement specifies the obligations for purchaser and seller such as price, inspection rights, earnest money, etc.

What are commons applications for the Family Purchase and Sale Agreement?

To minimize disputes resulting from verbal agreements, the written Purchase and Sale Agreement will provide evidence of the purchase and sale terms in which to proceed with a closing of the transaction. This Agreement is simplified for use only among family members. For example, a child may opt to purchase the family home place from a parent rather than having it sold to strangers.


Financial Power of Attorney - $60.00


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What is a Financial Power of Attorney?

A Financial Power of Attorney is a legal document that allows you to designate an individual to handle your financial matters when you are not able. This person will make decisions involving your assets and finances if you become unable (e.g., mental incapacity) to make these decisions for yourself. This person is referred to as your Agent (also sometimes referred to as your Attorney-in-Fact). A Financial Power of Attorney can take effect immediately and allows your designated Agent to act on your behalf until it is revoked. If not revoked sooner, the Power of Attorney is void upon your death. Generally, the Power of Attorney can be used at any time your Agent deems you to be incapacitated (or unavailable). However, you can add a requirement that your incapacity be supported by a doctor’s opinion. This would require that the Agent present a written statement from your primary care physician attesting to your incapacity before the Agent would have authority to act on your behalf (commonly referred to as a Springing Power of Attorney). Although this Springing Power of Attorney sounds favorable, it does provide a hurdle to the Agent before being able to manage finances and would not allow your Agent to assist with finances if you are unavailable (e.g. out of the country).

What are commons applications for the Financial Power of Attorney?

In the event of incapacity, a Financial Power of Attorney will allow your designated agent to manage your finances (e.g. pay bills, sign tax returns, invest assets, and sell property). If you do not designate an Agent to manage your finances prior to your incapacity, the only remaining option for your family will be to seek Court intervention, with all expenses of attorneys, court costs, bonds, etc. being paid from your funds. The elawconnection.com Financial Power of Attorney is considered “durable” since it stays in place after your incapacity. Once you pass away, the Financial Power of Attorney is void and of no further use.


Healthcare Advance Directive - $50.00


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What is a Healthcare Advance Directive?

An Advance Directive for Health Care is a legal document that allows a person to specify what actions should be taken for his/her health if he/she is no longer able to make decisions due to illness or mental incapacity. Another person, referred to as an Agent, is appointed to carry out the health care decisions. An Advance Directive for Health Care is also commonly referred to as a Living Will, Power of Attorney for Health Care, Advance Decision, and Personal Directive.

What are commons applications for the Healthcare Advance Directive?

When a person (the “Principal”) is unable to make his/her medical decisions, the Health Care Agent is empowered by the Advance Directive for Health Care to make necessary medical choices on behalf of the Principal. The medical choices include electing surgeries, consenting to procedures and medications, and the termination of life support in cases of coma, vegetative state, or terminal illness.


Irrevocable Trust for Family - $690.00


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What is an Irrevocable Trust for Family?

A separate legal entity created by a person (the “Grantor”) by signing a Trust Agreement and transferring assets to the Trust. The Trust Agreement is irrevocable and can’t be changed or modified. The Trust Agreement specifies who will manage the Trust assets (the “Trustee”) and how the assets are to be distributed and to whom (the “Beneficiaries”). The Beneficiaries of the Trust will be the Grantor, Grantor’s spouse, and Grantor’s children. The Trust will pay all income from the Trust for the lifetime benefit of the Beneficiaries. For assets that do not produce income (e.g. family vacation home, family heirlooms, firearms and other personal property), the Beneficiaries will have rights to use the assets.

What are commons applications for the Irrevocable Trust for Family?

The Irrevocable Trust for Family can be used to hold any asset for the benefit of the family. Possible assets include firearms, intellectual property (such as on-line media accounts), the family home place, gold, bank accounts, family heirlooms, land, and automobiles. Whatever asset is transferred to the Trust will be held and maintained for the lifetime of the Grantor, Grantor’s spouse, and Grantor’s descendants. The Trust will only require that all income, if any, is to be distributed annually. Generally, irrevocable trusts are used to preserve assets transferred to the trust.


Married Will with Children - $220.00 / person; $280.00 for both


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What is a Married Will with Children?

A Last Will and Testament is a legal document that describes what happens to an individual’s assets upon his or her death. The Will details who is in charge of settling your remaining affairs (the Executor). The Executor is responsible for settling final debts and then distributing remaining assets of the estate to those specified in the Will (the beneficiaries).

What are commons applications for the Married Will with Children?

Documenting the person you want to serve as Executor to administer your Estate and directing that all remaining assets (cash, cars, jewelry, real estate, and personal belongings) will be distributed to your spouse and then to your child(ren). The Will also specifies the individual that will be the guardian over any minor children.


Married Will without Children - $220.00 / person; $280.00 for both


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What is a Married Will without Children?

A Last Will and Testament is a legal document that describes what happens to an individual’s assets upon his or her death. The Will details who is in charge (the Executor) of collecting your assets, paying final expenses, settling final debts and then distributing remaining assets to those specified (the beneficiaries) in the Will.

What are commons applications for the Married Will without Children?

A Last Will and Testament specifies how you want your assets distributed upon death after all debts and expenses are paid. The Will specifies the individual(s) or charities that will receive your assets (cash, cars, jewelry, real estate, and personal belongings) in the event of your death.


Personal Service Contract - $85.00


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What is a Personal Service Contract?

The Personal Service Contract provided in elawconnection.com is a three page document that memorializes the financial and health care services provided to a client (in many cases an older individual). The client can also be compared to an employer. The individual providing the services is commonly referred to as the service provider/employee/contractor. The terms and conditions of the employer-employee relationship are described in detail in the Personal Service Contract, so that the employer and employee both have the same expectations. Personal Service Contracts are used to document health and financial services provided to the client and the fee to be received by the service provider. Services specified in the Personal Service Contract include monitoring the client’s health and hygiene, coordinating the necessary care, administering prescription medicines, coordinating living accommodations, advocating for resident and health care rights, monitoring health and medical needs of the client, and coordinating travel to/from medical facilities.

What are commons applications for the Personal Service Contract?

The Contract is used to memorialize the fees paid for assistance with medical and financial activities. Common reasons for the Contract include: (1) Supporting an income tax deduction, (2) eligibility and/or acquisition of government benefits, and (3) avoiding family disharmony with a written fee arrangement.


Qualified Income Trust - $440.00


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What is a Qualified Income Trust?

Nursing Home Medicaid allows qualified applicants to receive assistance with the long-term care expenses of 24 hour skilled care. Each state has rules governing income limits for eligibility. Of the states having an income “cap,” some allow the applicant’s income to funnel through a special trust to allow for eligibility in spite of the cap. This special trust is referred to as a Qualified Income Trust (or commonly referred to by some as a “Miller Trust”).

What are commons applications for the Qualified Income Trust?

The Qualified Income Trust is used by families to allow a nursing home resident to receive Medicaid benefits even though the resident has income that exceeds the income cap. The Qualified Income Trust is implemented (i.e., signed) by the resident or the resident’s legal representative (e.g. agent under financial power of attorney or legal conservator). Once signed, the manager of the Trust (i.e., the “Trustee”) procures a tax identification number at www.irs.gov, opens Trust bank account, and transfers the applicant’s monthly income through the Trust account.


Quitclaim Deed - $85.00


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What is a Quitclaim Deed?

A quitclaim deed is a written document that transfers a real property interest without warranties of title. It can be used for transferring (conveying) any title, claim, or interest in property, such as a house or land, from one person to another. The person transferring the property interest is the “Grantor” and the person receiving an interest in the property is the “Grantee.” A quitclaim deed is an instrument used by the Grantor to transfer whatever ownership interest he/she actually has in the property, however the Grantor does not guarantee that the property is free of debt, that he/she is the sole owner of the property, or that the Grantor has any ownership at all. The quitclaim deed simply conveys whatever interest the Grantor has in the property to the Grantee.

What are commons applications for the Quitclaim Deed?

Because of the lack of warranties made by the Grantor, a quitclaim deed is usually only used in transfers of property interests that don’t involve a sale. The quitclaim deed may be used for situations such as gifts, transfers related to a divorce, and transfers to family members.


Residential Lease Agreement - $65.00


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What is a Residential Lease Agreement?

A residential lease agreement is a written document that records the agreement between a landlord and a residential tenant. The lease agreement specifies the amount of rent, details regarding payment of the rental amount, the beginning and end dates of the rental, and a variety of other rules regarding the tenant’s and the landlord’s rights, duties, and responsibilities including maintenance and repair.

What are commons applications for the Residential Lease Agreement?

There are many reasons an individual or family may wish to rent their residential property to another person or persons. For example, some people acquire additional houses as a form of investment. Another example is when an adult has moved to a nursing or assisted living facility and they decide to lease their house to provide additional income and assist with keeping the property in good condition. Additionally, beneficiaries of an estate may inherit a house or other residential property that they would like to lease. The Residential Lease Agreement is an important document which details the terms of the lease in writing, and is a good way to prevent future problems -- whether the agreement is between family members, friends, acquaintances, or strangers.


Resignation - $55.00


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What is a Resignation?

A Resignation is a written document that allows a person to give up or quit serving in a position.

What are commons applications for the Resignation?

The elawconnection.com Resignation document is intended for a person to resign from serving in the following situations:

  1. Executor to a Last Will & Testament;
  2. Trustee of a Trust;
  3. Agent under a Financial Power of Attorney;
  4. Agent under a Health Care Advance Directive;
  5. Guardian appointment (either by Court or Will); or
  6. Conservator appointment (by a Court).

Revocable Living Trust - $490.00


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What is a Revocable Living Trust?

A separate legal entity created by a person (the “Grantor”) by signing a Trust Agreement and transferring assets to the Trust. The Trust Agreement specifies who will manage the Trust assets (the “Trustee”) and how the assets are to be distributed and to whom (the “Beneficiary”). The Beneficiary is generally the Grantor for his/her lifetime. After the Grantor passes, the Beneficiary is then the spouse of the Grantor, if any, and then the kids. There are no separate tax return requirements related to the Trust during the Grantor’s lifetime.

What are commons applications for the Revocable Living Trust?

Revocable Living Trusts have two primary purposes: (1) avoiding probate upon the death of the Grantor, and (2) allowing for management of Grantor’s assets upon his/her incapacity. A house owned by Grantor will have to be probated upon the death of the Grantor. A house owned by a Revocable Living Trust will not have to be probated upon death of the Grantor. To “fund” a house to the Trust, the Grantor will need to sign and record a property deed transferring the ownership to the Trust. Generally, a Last Will and Testament is modified to correspond to the Trust by “pouring over” all probate assets to the Trust.


Single Will with Children - $220.00


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What is a Single Will with Children?

A Last Will and Testament is a legal document that describes what happens to an individual’s assets upon his or her death. The Will details who is in charge of settling your remaining affairs (the Executor). The Executor is responsible for settling final debts and then distributing remaining assets of the estate to those specified in the Will (the beneficiaries).

What are commons applications for the Single Will with Children?

Documenting the person you want to serve as Executor to administer your Estate and directing that all remaining assets (cash, cars, jewelry, real estate, and personal belongings) will be distributed to your child(ren). The Will also specifies the individual that will be the guardian over any minor children.


Single Will without Children - $220.00


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What is a Single Will without Children?

A Last Will and Testament is a legal document that describes what happens to an individual’s assets upon his or her death. The Will details who is in charge (the Executor) of collecting your assets, paying final expenses, settling final debts and then distributing remaining assets to those specified (the beneficiaries) in the Will.

What are commons applications for the Single Will without Children?

A Last Will and Testament specifies how you want your assets distributed upon death after all debts and expenses are paid. The Will specifies the individual(s) or charities that will receive your assets (cash, cars, jewelry, real estate, and personal belongings) in the event of your death.


Unsecured Promissory Note (Due on Demand) - $110.00


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What is a Unsecured Promissory Note?

An Unsecured Promissory Note (Due on Demand) is a legal instrument that documents a loan between parties (individuals or business entities). A Promissory Note that is “due on demand” has no set repayment date. Instead, the lender (also referred to as the “Holder”) makes a demand for full payment of all outstanding principal and accrued interest. After the demand is made, the borrower generally has 120 days to satisfy the Promissory Note in full. The borrower (the “Maker”) is also free to repay in part or in full at any time before it is due without penalty. The Note also details how to make changes to the agreement. It is important to note that because this Note is unsecured, it does not create any security interest for the Holder. In other words, there is no collateral put up by the Maker to ensure repayment in the event of default. The reason a person or a business may want to use an unsecured loans is that they are easier to obtain and do not require the use of collateral to back the loan.

What are commons applications for the Unsecured Promissory Note?

If you plan to loan money to an individual or entity, even if the transaction is with a friend or family member, it is a good idea to formalize the agreement in writing. If you help a family member out and do not intend the transfer to be a gift, then you can document the transaction with a Promissory Note. No payment will be required unless you “demand” payment. This allows for the loan to be collected (or forgiven) at a later date.


Warranty Deed - $90.00


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What is a Warranty Deed?

A Warranty Deed is a written document that transfers a real property interest with warranties of title. Warranties of title means that the transferring person (Grantor) is assuring the receiver (Grantee) that the title is good. It can be used for transferring (conveying) any title, claim, or interest in property, such as a house or land, from one person to another. The person selling or giving the property is the “Grantor” and the person buying or receiving an interest in the property is the “Grantee.” By using a Warranty Deed the Grantor guarantees that he/she has clear title to the piece of property being transferred. “Clear title” means that the Grantor has full rights to the ownership of the property and has full rights to transfer that ownership interest (even if there is a mortgage on the property). A Warranty Deed is the typical instrument used to transfer real estate between two parties.

What are commons applications for the Warranty Deed?

Since the Grantor is “warranting” good title, the Warranty Deed is used in two primary situations:

  1. Sale to third party in which the buyer will require/demand that seller convey title via warranty; and
  2. Transactions with family members in which you want a prior insurance of title to pass to the new owner.